Inital GoPano 360 video tests #360 #gopanomicro

So, I’ve bought my GoPano micro adaptor (not many left!), conned my husband into ‘needing’ an iphone 5 (just happens to fit the GoPano Micro :)) and shot two pieces of 360 footage, not exciting pieces obviously, just me wandering round my house and outside, but I just needed some test footage to move forward with…

This is a screengrab from the inside shot.

Screengrab from test go pano 360 video shot

Screengrab from test go pano 360 video test shoot

I love that when you’re viewing it online you can turn around and zoom with keyboard controls.

  1. So problems that are easy to spot before I can develop it further are, I’m quite prominent in the frame, and staring at myself is not what I want to do – solution, test different ways of holding the camera and GoPano setup.
  2. Light needs to be good as the phone auto corrects as we move through and it doesn’t cope well with internal lighting.
  3. Finally – quality, is it up to scratch, this can only be really tested when I go a step further and see if I can view this video in my google cardboard VR glasses..

Lastly can I take it into a programme and add interactivity?

What I really want is one where the viewer can drive the movement, similar to Fibrums Rollercoaster where you start the ride by focusing your gaze on the ‘go’ lever within the environment.

A new addition to the recently updated Google Cardboard compatible apps is ‘Titans of Space’

Titans of Space® is a short guided tour of a few planets and stars, the point of which is to give the player a sense of scale of just how big these planets and stars are compared to each other.

In game visual from Titans of Space

In game visual from Titans of Space

Again this uses the mechanic that you have a virtual crosshair and focussing where you are looking, at a trigger will reward you with a reaction in game, very clever stuff..

I would ideally be able to wander around the created environment just by turning my head and opening doors or entering corridors with this virtual crosshair as my controller.

So I need to trial different capture methods to minimise my presence in the resulting video and test the video from gopano site with google Cardboard to see if it’s compatible… will report back soon!

Google Cardboard – VR out of a box!

So at last I had enough time to finally put together the VR Google Cardboard DIY headset. I had previously purchased one off of ebay, but it was so poorly cutout and made, I couldn’t even fit an old ipod touch into it, however, what it did get me was the lenses and the NFC chip that are actually quite tricky to get hold of.

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First step was to cut out the paper printouts and make sure they all would fit into my lovely bit of cardboard, I found that the regular corrugated stuff was not very usable.

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This the lovely thin but firm cardboard I rescued from a magimix box, just the right type of stuff.

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Unlike this rubbish that I bought from eBay…

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Tools needed included plenty of blades and my trusty scalpels…

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plus some good old spray mount, don’t you just love how it covers everything in a fine mist of stickiness 🙂

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Safety ruler at the ready and I start with the complicated section to hold in the lenses.

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Straight sections are a breeze but the circular areas look impossible to get smooth.

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Looking pretty good,  but it does take me 45 minutes to cut all the fiddly bits out, but I am very pleased that I haven’t lost my knife skills.

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Another hour sees all of the areas cut and ready for assembly, unfortunately I don’t have instructions as to how it all fits together and which way the lenses go in so a bit of youtube surfing ensues…

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Lenses and NFC chip ready to go in, but where?

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This is where the NFC chip for Google Cardboard goes!

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Add a bit of double sided to keep the lenses in position and squeeze it together.

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Put into the cut out slots and it’s all fitting together nicely. add a rubber band and some double sided velcro and it’s finished, although there seems to be a fatal flaw that my phone can just slip out either side, hmm, will have to look at an updated design for that bit…

 

Space in the side for my phone to slide out!

Space in the side for my phone to slide out!

Unfortunately, because my box is not plain cardboard it looks like I now have a magimix VR food viewer, but hey let’s give it a go!

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The first experience I want to try with GC is the Paul McCartney and Jaunt 360 app that I have already downloaded onto my phone.

http://mashable.com/2014/11/20/paulvmccartney-vr-app/

When I tried this without the GC it was amazingly clever, as the sound moves around as you turn, and with good headphones on is mightily impressive.

Then I have a look at what’s available within the Google Cardboard app itself on the Play store, it has a few things, one of the nicest was ‘windy day’ a cute little animated 360 film about a mouse with a big hat on a windy day. The funniest thing about this was I was obviously facing the wrong way and didn’t realise there was a character ‘stood’ behind me, I was just looking at the falling leaves!

The next demo was of sculptures that you could look all the way round, very nice, but not very immersive…

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.google.samples.apps.cardboarddemo&hl=en

I then started to search for a roller coaster 360 demo and I plumped for FiBrums offering, whicvh after I realised I needed to stare at the go lever it was very cool, in fact I was almost glad when it finished, very, very clever.

http://fibrum.ru/index_en.html

I also had a look at another offering from Jaunt – Kaiju Fury  which wasn’t very inspiring, but there are lots of things out there to play with.

I will start looking at things from a slightly different angle with my newly built Google Cardboard goggles and need to put them together with my leap motion for some truly immersive visual feasts!

So yes, it was definitely worth waiting for, and you cannot appreciate the experience without having a go, so I highly recommend making a pair for yourself, but if you don’t have 3 hours to put one together I would buy the official version from one of the 4 big companies that sell them such as dodo case or unofficial cardboard, this link takes you to the google page that explains a little more and gives you a link to the makers sites.

https://www.google.com/get/cardboard/get-cardboard.html

Give it a go!

The Norwich Fringe Festival

This year I have been invited to take part in the Norwich Fringe Festival and I wanted to explain a little of the background to my live interactive art.

I was inspired to bring an inanimate object to life when I visited the Norwich Castle Museum and saw the Great Bustard display they have there, although they are now being reintroduced on Salisbury Plain, they had been extinct and I felt that the static display could be enhanced in a non-destructive way using the newest technology that I had been experimenting with. All of the printed items are Augmented Reality enabled with the download of the Aurasma app, but to make it truly immersive and non-exclusive I have used a pressure mat to augment the physical reality of the sculpture.

This technology could be used for anything, to find out more information, or to make the object interactive and I would love to see it used in more places.

My research continues as I look at more discrete motion sensors, such as a Leap Motion, or a kinect for a more gesture based experience. My feedback from this installation has always been positive and somewhat satisfying to view the flying animation as you stand on the pressure mat and watch the Great Bustard fly across the wall in front of you.

It reacts, because you interact…

fringe

 

 

The Norwich Fringe Festival is open from 11-25th of October and I am part of the Undercroft show, free to the public and open from 12-7 most nights (not Monday 13th).
If you want to meet me I will be invigilating on both Thursday Afternoons.

The Booklet below works using Aurasma an AR app to show you all of the background videos, please feel free to download and play with the AR enabled images.

To access the Augmented Reality content of my piece, you will need to download the free Aurasma app on your mobile device, either Android or Apple. Because the software is very sophisticated your device will need to be less than 18 months old to see the 3D cgi content, I have tested an iPad3-working, a Samsung Galaxy S2-working and an ipod4-not working, all other trigger images work on all platforms. Once you have downloaded Aurasma, open the app and then search for my channel – Tracey Tutt – subscribe to my content and then all of the images will come to life with more information.

GreatBustard_booklet

 

Artist Statement

I want art to be playful and this piece depends on the viewer taking a closer look at the sculpture and this interaction causes a physical and audio reaction, making the viewer feel part of the whole experience.

I constantly research and experiment to push boundaries and find limits, I want to excite and stimulate the viewer, using my creativity to tell another story over the original, blending technology seamlessly with beauty by weaving different media together.

This installation draws together and implements all of my research and experimentation over the last two years and I am using a huge array of mediums and techniques from traditional plaster sculpting, projection mapping, spatial stereo sound, hand drawn animation using real feathers, coding, and physical interactivity in a truly immersive transmedia experience to ‘virtually’ bring to life a Great Bustard in Norfolk after 180 years since it’s last sighting.

USB lighting for Digital space

I will be mounting two larger pieces of AR Art on the wall for the initial focus for the participant, but many more will be available in the form of postcards and business cards and a demo booklet that I am inviting people to buy for a very modest sum of £2.50, to take my art away with them and play at home!

To display the two larger Artworks though I need to source lighting for that side of my installation as it is split into two sides, the ‘reality augmented’ where my sculpture and projection mapping will take place and the ‘augmented reality’  corner where my binoculars will sit on a plinth with my printed documents and the two artworks will be sited.

I have gone down the route of LED lighting using USB power as I need the lights to be low heat output as they will be on for 7-8 hours and constantly powered rather than relying on batteries.

USB Plug In 5LED Light

I found a positionable neck 5 led light stick, but needed to extend the tiny usb lead as it’s primary use is with a computer or laptop. With USB leads you do have to make sure that they are under 5 metres long, or you get reduced power output and need a repeater cable, fortunately I only needed 2 metres so was pretty sure it would be okay.

I also wanted to source a dual usb plug to reduce sockets needed and it seemed sensible as usb lights are only low volatge and masterplug do a reliable version of their plugs with the added bonus of a through socket, so I could actually power all of my plinths power needs ( 2 USB sockets and an ordinary plug socket) through this one plug – I may still need that option!

masterplugusb

I wanted to test that this light source was bright enough and with everything plugged in there was no reduction in power actually in situ, so took all the cables into my space earlier…

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So, in this picture we have the two led stick lights plugged into their own two 3 metre usb male to female extensions, plugged into the dual usb power socket of the masterplug, in the exact situation in my installation space.

I then stuck a test image onto the wall with blu-tac and attached one of the lights to the wall, to test if the light was strong enough for my phone to trigger the Aurasma content in this low light situation.

and it was…

The low light in this corner also did not spill over into the other area of my installation where my projection will be.

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3D Binocular Augmented Reality Viewer… done #augmentedreality #AR #aurasma

 

 

 

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Remember these?

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The central divider which turned them into a 3D viewer was a sticking point for them to view Augmented Reality, so I had to try and find a way to remove it without breaking the rest of the plastic surround.

I was very disappointed to realise that the plastic that they had used was in fact very strong, so a craft knife wasn’t even going to make a dent in the rigid structure.

I went down into the 3D workshop to see what tools they might have that could be of use… I thought that a curved hacksaw blade might do the trick, but it just wouldn’t work as you would have no room with which to draw the blade back and forth  any useful distance…

I then asked if they had any heavyduty ‘snips’ I remember using tin snips in previous making ventures and them cutting tin well… Luckily Jim did have a pair of snips, although he didn’t think they would get through the thick plastic.

He gave it a go and they went through the plastic easier than he thought they would! Brilliant.. I sat down to do it and found it really wasn’t as easy as Jim made it look, my feeble little hands struggled making the snips cut any sort of distance, so I resorted to taking tiny little nibbles out of the middle divider.

This was still really hard and also meant of course it took 3 times as long, about a hour and a half to get down the full length of the binoculars – and the blisters on my fingers will attest to this!

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Eventually, I reached a point where you couldn’t see anything left of the divider when looking through the eyepieces, so then turned to a large handled rasp to file away all of the little ragged edges.
wpid-dsc_0039.jpgPop in your ipod and hey presto AR Binoculars!

These will be used in my installation to demo my Augmented Reality booklet content and postcards.

I will be preloading the ipod with my own Aurasma channel – tracey tutt – so that all of my printed materials come to life when viewed through the AR Binoculars.

The idea behind making them binoculars comes from a desire to introduce devices to view content in a soft way, ie rather than have an obvious iphone or android smart phone sat in front of you, which could confuse frighten or just irritate the viewer I wanted it to be simple, pick it up in a tactile form – binoculars – and simply do the natural thing with the object, look through the eyepieces.

 

 

Aurasma Information icon for my show #aurasma

AR_iconFor my show I will have active Aurasma triggers within the space, so I needed to come up with a beautiful graphic to inform the viewer that here is not only a graphic, or photo, but an experience.

Using my line drawings and full colour Great Bustard illustrations and placing them so they appear to come out of the mobile devices screen in colour, gives the visual clue as to what you can hope to see.

 

Augmented Reality Binoculars

An innovative way of getting people to pick up a device to play with the interactivity that Augmented Reality can offer is one of the key things that I wanted to desperately try and include in my installation.

Inspiration came in the form of the digital loupe that I have previously talked about, and after a lot of searching Hasbro has a 3D ipod binocular device, that is perfect for my needs.

Ordered direct from the USA, it arrived today!

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It has several fittings for different iterations of iPhone, or ipod touch, and so has a camera hole already in the right place for the version I have.

But, as it’s supposed to be for 3D viewing there is a partition directly down the centre of the whole object, this is the only stumbling block.

Hopefully a hacksaw will sort that out!

I have tested it with a trigger image and all works well, you even have thumbholes with which to double tap to make the Augmented content full screen.

A quick camo paint job, and bob’s your uncle.

I will need to ask estates about securing the device, but it can be charged in situ so I am really pleased.

The Illustrated Bustard

Working on the next step I decided to illustrate the Bustards movements, so that I can easily align and check the movement before creating the final handdrawn pieces. I applied my usual style with illustrated graphics to the images of the Bustard that are my keyframes and as with a lot of the stuff that I do like this, I really like the way the wireframe looks – the way the outline looks before I fill it in.

I work in a particular way, as with my rotoscoped film, I have my base image/footage and draw the outline quickly and fluidly using my tablet and wacom pen, it’s like second nature to me now, but I draw the shapes with a view to what I will then fill them with and the order they sit in my layers to give a sense of depth.

Illustrated_1

So here is how they turned out.. I really like them and now I can use those wireframes to perfectly align the bodies and eyes to make a convincing bird in flight animation. This illustrated style will be used in the AR part of my installation and on the printed materials.

They also look lovely as a set, reminiscent of Muybridge and Marey.

illustrated bustard

 

Binocular iPad idea for installation

just came across the great piece about using AR in a museum.

I love the fact they made an iphone into a giant loupe/magnifying glass, and it became more native to hold it up and look through it rather than use it as a mobile device.

Augmented Reality idea

theloupe

<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/88233719″>meSch prototype: the loupe</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/waag”>Waag Society</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

Perhaps I could create something  that would work in the same physical way as their ‘loupe’ but be associated with birdwatching, ie  binoculars, again removing people from the device and making it more secure

 

ARtSENSE and Manifest.AR

A great piece from Roger McKinley (Liverpool FACT in conjunction with ARtSENSE and Manifest.AR)

Abstract

A large section of the cultural heritage sector not usually thought of as Cultural Heritage is the contemporary and temporary art galleries and spaces. Many such institutions do not have traditional collection mechanisms nor permanent artefacts and exhibitions, but rather a rolling programme constantly in flux. This represents a new challenge in terms of a systemised approach to learning and public engagement strategies, but also offers an opportunity to propose new learning and engagement mechanisms through the prism of its one unique selling point– the artistic creative engagement of artists and art practitioners. This paper examines the potential of Augmented Reality for the museum and gallery visiting experience focusing particularly on the ways through which AR as an emerging technology may inform emerging art practices all by encouraging public participation and engagement with art.

Keywords: museum, galleries, New Media Art, Augmented Reality, public engagement, visitor experience

What we find changes who we become. – Peter Morville

1. Augmented Reality, public engagement and new media art

Contemporary and new media art and artists typically occupy an interstitial place with respect to dominant or systematised approaches to heritage culture. As ‘insider-outsiders’ they simultaneously contribute to those structures and practices and critique them. A number of contemporary artists have started investigating the territories normally bound within carefully controlled systems by means of emerging technologies. They are generating new artistic modes of production that provoke and encourage a shift in established ways of creating, exposing, sharing and providing narratives.

Within this more fluid framework, several questions arise: How do we approach the processes of artistic creation in ways that embrace social technologies to personalise the museum and gallery experience? In this context, how does either the “invasive” or lightweight and potentially ubiquitous nature of AR technologies shape contemporary new media artistic creation? Can AR assist in passing from the “I” of the Artist to the “we” of participation to reshape the relationships between the public and the museum and gallery space? How can AR effectively expand the exhibition space outside the gallery’s walls and into the city? And how can all of the above change our perception of what may actually constitute a Museum?

This paper explores the design and curatorial strategy behind the upcoming exhibition, “Turning FACT Inside Out”, featuring multiple mobile AR artworks, interactions and installations conceived by the international artists’ collective, Manifest.AR and commissioned and curated by FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology) in Liverpool, UK. The exhibition and the work presented in this paper is taking place within the European ARtSENSE research project that explores the potential of Adaptive Augmented Reality for enhancing the museum and gallery visiting experience through the combined use of visual, audio and physiological sensors

read the full piece here…..

http://mw2013.museumsandtheweb.com/paper/artsense-and-manifest-ar-revisiting-museums-in-the-public-realm-through-emerging-art-practices/

R. McKinley and A. Damala, ARtSENSE and Manifest.AR: Revisiting Museums in the Public Realm through Emerging Art Practices. In Museums and the Web 2013, N. Proctor & R. Cherry (eds). Silver Spring, MD: Museums and the Web. Published January 31, 2013. Consulted March 12, 2014 .